Osborne Perry Anderson

Osborne Perry Anderson (1830–1871) was an African-American abolitionist and the only surviving African-American member of John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, and later a soldier in the Union army of the American Civil War.[1]

In 1830 Anderson was born a free African-American in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He completed basic schooling and later attended Oberlin College in Ohio, after which he moved to Chatham, Ontario, CANADA in 1850 and opened shop as a printer. This skill served him later as an abolitionist.

In the spring of 1858 Anderson met John Brown and learned of the ill-fated revolution that he was planning. Because of his writing skills Anderson was appointed as the recording secretary at several of the meetings and was eventually promoted to a member of Brown’s provisional congress.[2] During the infamous raid on Harper’s Ferry Anderson was stationed with Albert Hazlett, and once it became apparent to them that the raid was a failure they both retreated to Pennsylvania.

Upon the start of the Civil War Anderson became a noncommissioned officer of the Union Army. He died in Washington D.C. in 1872.[6]

Osborne Perry Anderson